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Why It’s Better to Fail Today Than Be Perfect Tomorrow

Why It’s Better to Fail Today Than Be Perfect Tomorrow

The ideal tomorrow will never come. In the rare chance that it does come, then you will move your goal to another, idealistic environment. If you ar

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The ideal tomorrow will never come. In the rare chance that it does come, then you will move your goal to another, idealistic environment. If you are stuck, this may be why.

This is why you should start today.

You have momentum

Have something you want or even need to pursue? It’s only going to get more difficult to start it in the future. There are two big reasons.

First, now you have momentum. At the genesis of an idea, we have the biggest spark – and, like a star being born, the rest of the time is spent hurling towards losing energy and the inevitable death. In your case, it is the death of your idea.

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I had what I believed were great ideas. I was so passionate about them, so confidence in their world-changing ability, that I though the momentum would last forever. Today, the only reason I remember them is because I wrote them down. I didn’t do anything with them and, to paraphrase Elizabeth Gilbert’s excellent Big Magic, the ideas moved on to someone else who would do something with them.

You have time

You also have more time and, perhaps, more energy than you will have likely in any other period of time in the future. Some of my younger coaching clients believe they are too busy in their late teens-early twenties to start something new. My middle-aged clients would laugh at the younger group, but often say the same thing – which sounds absurd to my senior clients.

Everyone worries about running out of time today, but aren’t realizing that they are really running out of time tomorrow.

The first layer is what Laura Vanderkam calls “time dividend”. As I mentioned recently (and she shares in her book, Off The Clock), consistently working on a craft or building an audience now creates a kind of compound interest in your results. In my case, I’ve written hundreds of columns for you to read, and sharping those skills, honing those ideas and gaining your trust created the foundation for the best-selling books, coaching business and the worldwide keynotes. Those things require time.

The second layer is the natural, increasing complexity of our lives as we get older. Most high school students don’t have rent or a mortgage, just as early twenty-somethings don’t have offspring going to college, just as thirtysomethings don’t have to immediately fund retirement. And all of these groups have no age-related issues or illness occurring in the middle-aged and up crowd.

When I was much younger, as I pulled together my pennies to see the world, some friends said they would travel when they got older. When it would get easier, they said. The assumption was that they would have time, they would have freedom and, most notably, they would have perfect health. Decades later, some of them never left home.

As Seth Godin puts it, this should be reassuring: It means now is the very best moment for you to start your movement.

It will not get any better. You might as well start right now.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

This article is from Inc.com

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