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A New Study of More Than 32 Million Employees Just Revealed the 4 Big Reasons You Should Quit Your Job Right Now

A New Study of More Than 32 Million Employees Just Revealed the 4 Big Reasons You Should Quit Your Job Right Now

So, what's the problem? Why are so many people making plans to quit? Are you among them? A recent study of more than 32 million employees by Pea

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So, what’s the problem? Why are so many people making plans to quit?

Are you among them?

A recent study of more than 32 million employees by Peakon, an employee engagement platform developer, explored the warning signs that an employee is thinking about quitting his or her job. The study pointed out “a number of clear, measurable warning signs that show up exactly nine months before the employee decides to leave.”

The results of this study also point to four big reasons why people decide to quit their jobs in the first place. If you’re feeling one or more of the following things on the job, chances are you’ll soon be making plans to quit–if you haven’t already hit the road:

1. You find your work unchallenging.

No one wants to spend nine or ten hours in the office every day bored and feeling unchallenged. We want to be challenged in our jobs, and we crave accomplishment–making good things happen and achieving our goals. According to the Peakon report, “A sense of accomplishment is a key driver of employee engagement–and essential to a healthy, rewarding work experience.” If your work and job aren’t challenging you, you’re a prime candidate to quit.

2. You feel like you can’t discuss pay.

While money isn’t everything for most of us, it is important. Not only do we need cash to pay the bills, but it provides a clear measure of our value to the organization and has an impact on our sense of self-worth. Being paid a fair salary often requires discussing pay with our boss–but sometimes such discussions are not welcome, which causes problems. As the Peakon report explains, “the inability to talk openly about pay with their managers can cause employees to disengage, and become more likely to quit.”

3. You don’t feel great about your manager.

One of the most important relationships any of us have at work is our relationship with our manager. And if the relationship is a bad one, that may spur us to look for greener pastures. As the old saying goes, people don’t quit a job–they quit their boss. According to the Peakon report, when employees don’t feel great about their managers, they begin to disengage quickly. And if managers don’t do anything to turn this around, they can expect their employees to actively seek other opportunities.

4. You don’t see a path for personal development.

We all want to grow in our jobs–to learn more and progress up the organization. But, when there’s no path for personal development, then there may be little reason for us to stick around very long. Says the Peakon report:

Since our jobs form a large part of our identity in the modern age, it’s especially important that our organization is able to support us on this path. When we feel our role is helping us develop into our best self, it can have an incredibly powerful impact on employee engagement.

Lacking those opportunities, an employee starts to disengage. The data shows that nine months before quitting, employees begin to show a decline when asked questions related to their ongoing development–in effect, all aspects of growth are stalled.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

This article is from Inc.com

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