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Here’s a Tip From NASA on Sparking Creativity

Here’s a Tip From NASA on Sparking Creativity

First, there's cognitive diversity. The Studio is staffed by a thoughtful and eclectic team of designers, artists and social scientists. Daniel Goo

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First, there’s cognitive diversity. The Studio is staffed by a thoughtful and eclectic team of designers, artists and social scientists. Daniel Goods, is a visual strategist and director of The Studio. The Studio finds creative ways to support the scientists. Goods and his team help scientists frame their research questions, explain their research story in tangible, visual story form such as The Line of Sight installation and even help install way-finding for conferences. In many ways The Studio is made up of a collective of gifted translators. They are able to communicate really complex ideas from physicists and astronomers into engaging and inspiring stories that spark new ideas and questions. 

The second takeaway is the metrics they use. They start with really good questions. When I visited The Studio I was struck by a list of 3 questions they use to determine a project’s desirability, viability and feasibility:  

  1. Does the project achieve and exceed clients goals?
  2. Does the project make you grow as a designer?
  3. Is the project innovative, fresh and new? Do people want to imitate it or steal it?

You might substitute a few words here or there. For example, in question #2, you might ask how the project helps you to grow as a marketing professional, or coder, or strategist. What I like about question #2 is that client work become opportunities for personal and professional growth. They spark inside-out growth. Question #1 starts first with the clients’ needs. And I also like the second part of question #3. To ask if people want to steal your idea reminds me of Austin Kleon’s Steal Like an Artist– a high form of flattery. The Studio fundamentally wants to ensure that their work starts with clear expectations, engages people, uses story and is timeless.

If this is how our country stimulates its most audacious explorations into space and our oceans, imagine what it will do for your business. 

Published on: Aug 2, 2019

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

This article is from Inc.com

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