fbpx

How to Master Your Schedule and Be More Present Today

How to Master Your Schedule and Be More Present Today

You may want a bigger company, larger prominence or more customers, but the closer you get to your goal, the more conscious you have to be about man

Which Meetings to Skip When Working From Home
Here’s the Brutal Truth About Going to Work Sick: You’re Much More Contagious Than You Think
Do You Wish Your Meetings Were More Productive? This New Study Reveals the Real Reasons Why They’re Not

You may want a bigger company, larger prominence or more customers, but the closer you get to your goal, the more conscious you have to be about managing the business of your business. Time is perhaps your most important commodity. Without mastering time, any progress you have will be short lived. There is a reason why Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and other well-known leaders say “No” way more than they say “Yes”.

There are three smart ways to maximize your time every day.

Set your intention with every chunk of time

If you don’t plan your life, then life will plan it for you. Gaps in your schedule will naturally be filled with other people’s needs, random detours and wasted pursuits. You may be fine with that, but this isn’t the route you need to take if you’re going to make any impact on the world.

In Indistractable, Eyal talks about being OK with wasting time. The real issue comes when we don’t actually decide to waste time. It is trouble when wasted time “just happens.”

For instance, I may decide to take a nap this afternoon – an actual daily practice of mine. However, I schedule in the nap just like a dentist appointment: No meetings are set at that time, I plan on doing it for a set time and I make sure a priority doesn’t conflict with my intention. This is vastly different than me randomly dozing off at the computer or staring off into space when I’m on deadline.  

Figure out how you spend your time

The average American spends about 90 minutes a day watching television. You don’t want to know how much time is spent on social media.

Time management expert Laura Vanderkam talks about tracking your time. Try it for a day: On an spreadsheet, break down your day into half hour pieces. How are you spending that time? It helps if you fill out the action as soon as it is done.

You will likely be amazed at the time you spent looking at your phone, struggling with a simple tech problem or even working well past your office hours. The point isn’t to shame yourself into change, but rather to make you conscious of how you spend your time.

Accept that you can never catch up time

Feeling like you’re on the verge of burning out? In working as a coach, I find most people are stressed because they are trying to make up for something in the past rather than building something in the future. We’re trying to “catch up” on lost time. The problem is that you can’t catch up on lost time. It’s gone.

Worse, working twice as hard now to make up for the past makes you more susceptible to overwork, mistakes and fatigue. 

I’m 34, so let’s be super optimistic and say I’ll be hanging around drawing stick figures till I’m 90. If so, I have a little under 60 winters left… I read about five books a year, so even though it feels like I’ll read an endless number of books in the future, I actually have to choose only 300 of all the books out there to read and accept that I’ll sign off for eternity without knowing what goes on in all the rest.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

This article is from Inc.com

Do You Enjoy This Article?
Sign up for our newsletter and receive FREE access to download SuccessDigest Digital Weekly Edition for attainment of your financial freedom in the new digital economy!

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0
%d bloggers like this: