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Job Description: “Women don’t do well here.”

Job Description: “Women don’t do well here.”

When you're hiring a tough to fill role, it is essential to be honest about the struggles you'll face in it. Ascend Medical does an excellent job of

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When you’re hiring a tough to fill role, it is essential to be honest about the struggles you’ll face in it. Ascend Medical does an excellent job of explaining what is difficult in this job as a hospitalist in Bullhead City, Arizona. “I would say our physicians get called 2 to 3 times a night but don’t always have to come back.”

That’s useful information to have and makes for a good job description. But the description goes off the rails with this bit of information: “Women don’t do well here.”

I contacted Ascend Medical and asked why women don’t do well. They didn’t answer that question but did respond with this message:

The posting you inquired about was taken down immediately upon it’s [sic] being brought to our attention, as it in no way reflects our company’s beliefs, core values, or policies.

Please accept our sincere apologies.

I asked for more information about what happened to the person who posted it, but I haven’t heard back. From the style of the job description–using “I” phrases–I suspect that the hiring manager wrote this and the recruiting firm, Ascend Medical just posted it without reviewing it for legal issues.

Please remember, hiring managers do not know employment law. Maybe six women have been through this position in rapid succession, and the hiring manager was trying to be helpful. But, to get to the point where you’re a board-certified hospitalist, any doctor–male or female–should be able to handle this job. If women don’t do well, it’s not a problem with the women but the environment.

These big recruiting sites can’t police everything, but they still need to act quickly when they learn of an error. And there should be a process in place to double-check. Again, it falls on the responsibility of the company that posts the message.

To be clear: you cannot discriminate on the basis of sex except in very few situations called a bonafide occupational qualification (BFOQ). A hospitalist would not meet that requirement.

Race is never a BFOQ. 

If you see a bad job description, let me know. I’ll happily follow up with the company. This should never have been posted. Whoever wrote the job description needs serious remedial training or perhaps termination, if this is part of an ongoing pattern. This is not okay.

Discrimination still exists and exposure is the best way to fight against it. 

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

This article is from Inc.com

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