fbpx

Murder mystery: how Death in Paradise quietly became one of TV’s biggest hits

Mocked by critics, the tropical-island crime drama has been attracting a large and appreciative audience for a decade. It’s time it was reassessedDeat

Working from home ‘damaging Britain’s creative potential and economic wellbeing’
The Trouble with Maggie Cole
Nurseries in England warn they face ruin without Covid support

Mocked by critics, the tropical-island crime drama has been attracting a large and appreciative audience for a decade. It’s time it was reassessed

Death in Paradise is the Céline Dion of British TV: mocked in adolescence, tolerated in its prime, beloved in its dotage. When the show debuted in 2011, it was annihilated by critics, including at this newspaper. “The TV equivalent of a boring holiday timeshare,” the Guardian noted. “Everyone’s a caricature, their essential qualities semaphored with a brutal simplicity,” the Independent observed. “A macabre advertisement for a tropical juice drink,” quipped the Telegraph.

And yet … it may not feature Ruth Wilson in a felt cloche with a CGI monkey, or the implacable Mark Rylance in a codpiece, but Death in Paradise has been pulling in ratings bigger than flagship BBC dramas on a modest budget, using a cast of C-list actors, week after week, for nine years. The show is licensed to more than 230 territories and is often the best-performing drama on the BBC; its most-watched episode, series six premiere Erupting in Murder, pulled in more than 9 million viewers, while last year’s series averaged 8.14 million weekly viewers, making it the most-watched programme of the day. (By comparison, Wolf Hall pulled in about 3-4 million viewers an episode.)

Continue reading…

Do You Enjoy This Article?
Sign up for our newsletter and receive FREE access to download SuccessDigest Digital Weekly Edition for attainment of your financial freedom in the new digital economy!

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS:
%d bloggers like this: