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Pandemic-related technologies take center stage at the first-ever virtual CES

Pandemic-related technologies take center stage at the first-ever virtual CES

Pandemic-related gadgets are taking over the first-ever virtual Consumer Electronics Show.The popular technology event moved online due to the lingeri

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Pandemic-related gadgets are taking over the first-ever virtual Consumer Electronics Show.

The popular technology event moved online due to the lingering coronavirus pandemic, but that has not hindered companies from showcasing new innovations that help keep the virus at bay.

Firms shared first looks of technologies that will help people return to the office, ease anxieties among those under lockdown and stay safe while out and about in the real world.

These gadgets include a coin-sized device that monitors vitals to identify possible coronavirus symptoms, a cat-like robot that mimics a real pet and smart masks that measure air quality. 

Pandemic-related gadgets are taking over the first-ever virtual Consumer Electronics Show. The popular technology event moved online due to the lingering coronavirus pandemic, but that has not hindered companies from showcasing new innovations that help keep the virus at bay

Pandemic-related gadgets are taking over the first-ever virtual Consumer Electronics Show. The popular technology event moved online due to the lingering coronavirus pandemic, but that has not hindered companies from showcasing new innovations that help keep the virus at bay

Pandemic-related gadgets are taking over the first-ever virtual Consumer Electronics Show. The popular technology event moved online due to the lingering coronavirus pandemic, but that has not hindered companies from showcasing new innovations that help keep the virus at bay

Hundreds of thousands of people from across the globe typically make the trek to Las Vegas, Nevada around this time to feast their eyes on the latest and greatest technologies.

This year is very different, as the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) was forced to host the popular event entirely online due to the lingering pandemic.

But the new venue has not stopped companies from showing off their new innovations and many of them are related to the virus.

Vaccinations have been made available in the US and many other parts of the world, which aims to help society break out of their homes and back into the real world – and BioButton wants to make sure that happens safely.

BioIntelliSense showcased a coin-sized wearable that sticks to a user’s chest and monitors vitals such as skin temperature, respiratory and heart rate, activity level and sleep quality

BioIntelliSense showcased a coin-sized wearable that sticks to a user’s chest and monitors vitals such as skin temperature, respiratory and heart rate, activity level and sleep quality

BioIntelliSense showcased a coin-sized wearable that sticks to a user’s chest and monitors vitals such as skin temperature, respiratory and heart rate, activity level and sleep quality

BioIntelliSense showcased a coin-sized wearable that sticks to a user’s chest and monitors vitals such as skin temperature, respiratory and heart rate, activity level and sleep quality.

By using all of these measurements, the device is capable of identifying if a user develops coronavirus symptoms – even if they themselves do not feel sick.

James Mault, MD, CEO of BioIntelliSense, said: ‘We are extremely honored to be named Best of Innovation as a CES 2021 Innovation Award honoree.’

‘The commercial launch of the BioButton COVID-19 symptom screening and vaccine monitoring solution is timely in addressing the growing challenge of safe return to worksites, school, travel, conferences and entertainment.’

‘The BioButton is the newest addition to our biosensor portfolio and data services model for public health and clinical applications that span infectious disease, orthopedics, oncology, and cardiac care.’

While some devices are helping the public stay safe outside their homes, others are looking to help them cope with being locked inside – the Petit Qoobo robot is designed to just that. This round, furry robot is made to look like a cat without a head and legs

While some devices are helping the public stay safe outside their homes, others are looking to help them cope with being locked inside – the Petit Qoobo robot is designed to just that. This round, furry robot is made to look like a cat without a head and legs

While some devices are helping the public stay safe outside their homes, others are looking to help them cope with being locked inside – the Petit Qoobo robot is designed to just that. This round, furry robot is made to look like a cat without a head and legs

The BioButton has already received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its ability to detect symptoms in just a few days.

While some devices are helping the public stay safe outside their homes, others are looking to help them cope with being locked inside – the Petit Qoobo robot is designed to just that.

This round, furry robot is made to look like a cat without a head and legs.

It is available in four realistic shades of faux-fur that, according its Japanese maker Yukai Engineering, is ‘reminiscent of skittish, young animals’ and even produces its own ‘heartbeat’ that users can hear and feel.

The Petit Qooboo did appear at CES 2020 as a prototype, but today’s unveiling is of a working product for $110.

Masks have become part of our everyday attire and many companies have transformed the cloth design into technologies to help improve lives.

AirPop has been making masks five years before the coronavirus took hold of the world, but has tweaked the original design for exercising and added the ability to measure air quality.

AirPop has been making masks five years before the coronavirus took hold of the world, but has tweaked the original design for exercising and added the ability to measure air quality

AirPop has been making masks five years before the coronavirus took hold of the world, but has tweaked the original design for exercising and added the ability to measure air quality

AirPop has been making masks five years before the coronavirus took hold of the world, but has tweaked the original design for exercising and added the ability to measure air quality

Called Active+, the mask is fitted with sensors that link to a smartphone.

This allows the mask to monitor everything from breathes per minute to outside air quality.

Some companies are slowly bringing employees back to the office after months, but allowing staff to split their time working from home.

Such a move means people will be commuting and lugging their laptops and other belongings to and from work, which may increase their risk of collecting bacteria and viruses along the way.

To address this problem, the American firm Targus debut a virus-killing keyboard light and antimicrobial backpack at CES.

Targus debuted its UV-C LED Disinfection Light that kills up to 99.9 percent of viruses and bacteria that may sneak onto a keyboard

Targus debuted its UV-C LED Disinfection Light that kills up to 99.9 percent of viruses and bacteria that may sneak onto a keyboard

Targus debuted its UV-C LED Disinfection Light that kills up to 99.9 percent of viruses and bacteria that may sneak onto a keyboard

Targus also showed off the 2Office Antimicrobial Backpack that holds a laptop and features antimicrobial infused protective finish on key touchpoints to prevent the growth of microorganisms on the backpack

Targus also showed off the 2Office Antimicrobial Backpack that holds a laptop and features antimicrobial infused protective finish on key touchpoints to prevent the growth of microorganisms on the backpack

Targus also showed off the 2Office Antimicrobial Backpack that holds a laptop and features antimicrobial infused protective finish on key touchpoints to prevent the growth of microorganisms on the backpack

The UV-C LED Disinfection Light kills up to 99.9 percent of viruses and bacteria that may sneak onto a keyboard.

Designed to sit on a desktop, the AC-powered light runs for 5 minutes, every hour disinfecting the workspace through automatic settings via motion sensors.

If any motion is detected within the safety zone or directly outside of the active cleaning area, the UV-C LEDs will be automatically disabled and resume again after five minutes of inactivity.

Targus also showed off the 2Office Antimicrobial Backpack that holds a laptop and features antimicrobial infused protective finish on key touchpoints to prevent the growth of microorganisms on the backpack.

This post first appeared on Dailymail.co.uk

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