Spam, the Canned Meat Product, Takes a Crazy Page From Starbucks

Spam, the Canned Meat Product, Takes a Crazy Page From Starbucks

Pay much attention to Spam? Not the glut of unwanted emails sitting in your inbox but the canned meat product. Owned by Hormel, the brand has been adv

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Pay much attention to Spam? Not the glut of unwanted emails sitting in your inbox but the canned meat product. Owned by Hormel, the brand has been advertising regularly, but who pays attention? The work hasn’t been particularly witty or outlandish.

That is, until now. Spam has received some broad attention now that the pumpkin spice edition has been announced as coming out in September and available through out.

Yes, pumpkin spice. Just the accompaniment for your pumpkin spice latte.

This is droll marketing. Or is it troll marketing?

The world has become inundated with pumpkin spice this, that, and the other thing. Starbucks is reportedly releasing its annual latte variation on the earliest date it ever has. Busch even announced a pumpkin spice latte hard seltzer that turned out to be a joke. (Some might question whether the reference to their own product as “nectar of the gods” might not also be humor, but that’s another discussion.)

So you might wonder about a pumpkin spice version of Spam. They claim it’s a real thing, going on sale in limited quantities in Walmarts or direct from the comapany.

So, what’s going on here? If it’s not a joke, is it jumping on an already old bandwagon that, at the extremes, has including pumpkin spice versions of such products as potato chips, Peeps, hummus, toothpaste, beard oil, and dog shampoo? (Fido looks up with pleading eyes as if to ask who spilled Starbucks all over him.)

The clever part of this promotion is that it manages to successfully straddle multiple lines and simultaneously reach different groups in different ways as a result. For example, say someone is a head-over-heels fan of pumpkin spice flavor, literally hooked on that combination of ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves. Not a Spam fan, possibly never having tried it, but potentially willing now, with the new variation, to buy a can either at Walmart or direct from the company.

Though, if trying it for a lark, remember that it comes in two-packs.

Let’s say that someone already eats spam. This becomes a way to get an additional purchase of double amounts (good for revenue numbers) out of curiosity.

Not a fan of pumpkin spice? Then the promotion could be perceived as a tongue-in-cheek bit of satire and consumers can be in on the joke, which may not turn into sales but might help reframe some future brand perceptions.

The entire campaign is good for entrepreneurs to consider. Maybe you can’t do something on an equal scale, but you might be able to get something similar.

  1. Segment the market into rough groups by attitudes toward your brand.
  2. Look at ideas you can lay on top of the attitudes toward your brand.
  3. Pick one that offers a chance to create affinity to your brand with new group segments.
  4. Use ambiguity in presentation to let people assume you’re either in on a joke with them or serious about the concept.

This article is from Inc.com

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