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‘Godzilla wasp’ SWIMS underwater to catch its prey

‘Godzilla wasp’ SWIMS underwater to catch its prey

A terrifying new species of wasp has been discovered that can swim underwater.The newly-discovered Japanese critter received the moniker 'Godzilla was

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A terrifying new species of wasp has been discovered that can swim underwater.

The newly-discovered Japanese critter received the moniker ‘Godzilla wasp’ by its exerts due to its similarity to the sci-fi monster when it emerges from the water.  

The animal, also known by its scientific name Microgaster godzilla, looks for aquatic caterpillars which live on water and hide inside algae and other plants.  

When the wasp locates the creature, which live in protective cases, it dives underwater and attacks from underneath. 

The animal, also known by its scientific name Microgaster godzilla, looks for aquatic caterpillars which live on water and hide inside algae and other plants

The animal, also known by its scientific name Microgaster godzilla, looks for aquatic caterpillars which live on water and hide inside algae and other plants

 The animal, also known by its scientific name Microgaster godzilla, looks for aquatic caterpillars which live on water and hide inside algae and other plants

The wasp can be submerged for several seconds while it tussles with the larvae before eventually forcing it from its shell. 

Once its prey is exposed, the wasp emerges form the depths and latches on, inserting its parasitic larvae into the flesh of the caterpillar. 

The eggs later eat the animal from the inside, using it as a food source before eventually hatching.

Most wasps are strictly against going near the water, with only two other species considered to be aquatic. 

However, none have ever been documented diving into the water completely and deliberately. 

The newly-found animal was given the moniker 'Godzilla wasp' by its discoverers due to its similarity to the sci-fi monster (pictured) when it emerges out of the water. The animal is also known by its scientific name Microgaster godzilla

The newly-found animal was given the moniker 'Godzilla wasp' by its discoverers due to its similarity to the sci-fi monster (pictured) when it emerges out of the water. The animal is also known by its scientific name Microgaster godzilla

 The newly-found animal was given the moniker ‘Godzilla wasp’ by its discoverers due to its similarity to the sci-fi monster (pictured) when it emerges out of the water. The animal is also known by its scientific name Microgaster godzilla

First murder hornet is captured ALIVE 

Washington officials have found evidence of more ‘murder hornets’ in the state.

Formally known as Asian giant hornets, three new insects were spotted by local residents near the town of Blaine in northeastern Whatcom County.

Officials were able to capture one of the hornets, which was seen attacking a paper wasp nest – this is the first to be caught alive.  

The number of hornets found, nearly doubling the previous number discovered in Washington, would indicate a nest has been established in the area, according to he Department if Agriculture. 

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‘The reasons why we decided to use the name of Godzilla for the wasp species are interesting,’ said Dr. Jose Fernandez-Triana from the Canadian National Collection of insects in Ottawa. 

‘First, being a Japanese species, it respectfully honours Godzilla, a fictional monster (kaiju) that became an icon after the 1954 Japanese film of the same name and many remakes afterwards.

‘It has become one of the most recognisable symbols of Japanese popular culture worldwide. 

‘Second, the wasp’s participation behaviour bears some loose resemblance to the kaiju character, in the sense that the wasp suddenly emerges from the water to parasites the host, similar to how Godzilla suddenly emerges from the water in the movies. 

‘Third, Godzilla has sometimes been associated, albeit in different ways, with Mothra, another kaiju that is typically portrayed as a larva (caterpillar) or an adult moth. 

‘As you can see, we had biological, behavioural and cultural reasons to justify our choice of a name.

‘Of course, that and having a bit of fun, because that is also an important part of life and science!’

The findings are published in the Journal of Hymenoptera Research.

This post first appeared on Dailymail.co.uk

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